Virginia Russolo


Virginia Russolo

BETWEEN THE EYES OF A HORSE

The title of this work was inspired by Patti Smith’s song ‘Land’. The line ‘How Much Fits Between the Eyes of a Horse’ feeds Smith’s rich imagery which takes place between parallel realities.
Large pocket-like elements of waxed fabric characterise this tapestry-like painting. The imagery contained is imagined existing in the space between the eyes of a horse, crossing a space that is not linear but is instead curved.
The figure of a soldier, sourced from Venetian frescoes from the 400s, in confronted with the throne of the Palace of Knossos, a symbol of matriarchal power. On the throne a split pomegranate takes the Priestess’ place. Everything develops underneath the arches of the Venetian Republic’s iconic bifore (Venetian windows), patriarchal power, that transform themselves into a pomegranate tree-fountain. Contained in the front pocket is a female figure holding a veil. The image’s perspective is distorted and is akin to that of a monument seen from below. The veil’s symbolism retraces different schools of thought such as the veil as an illusion of what is the perceived reality, according to Hindu-Buddhist thought. Whilst to Plutarch, Isis’s veil symbolises the impenetrability of nature’s secrets – I am she who has always been and always will be and no mortal shall lift my veil. The veil does not only exist as a portal or obstacle in reaching other realities but also as Leon Battista Alberti’s veil. This prospective tool invented in the 400s constituted of a stretched veil through which one was able to determine perspective aided by its weft. Through this veil perceived reality is flattened on a visual level.
The piece ebbs and flows between the various layers of images and symbols whilst at the same time holding a space for transformation, confrontation and coexistence between realities.

 

bio

Virginia Russolo (Conegliano, 1995) lives and works between Oderzo and Venice. She graduated from the Yokohama International School of Tokyo, Japan, where she lived for four years, she graduated in Fine Arts from The Ruskin School of Art, Oxford University. Virginia Russolo explores the figures of women, men and animals in relation to both the natural environment and to the dream world. Her works have been exhibited at T293 gallery (Predatory Behaviour), Modern Art Oxford (Ruskin Shorts), Tate Modern (Future Late), Pitt Rivers Museum (Love Anthro) and in the permanent collections of the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology and of the British School at Athens in Knossos.